Harnessing Pavlov’s Theory to go from Worrywart to a Fucking Superhero

SuperLegoman

Believe it or not, I’m actually going to show you a way to unleash a superpower. No need for gamma rays. No high-tech suit of armor required. This power is already in you, even if you don’t have mutant DNA.

But first, we need to define what this superpower actually is. Or maybe we should start with what it isn’t. I know the powers you’re hoping for: superhuman strength, telepathy, the ability to fly.

Sorry, it ain’t any of those.

What about super regeneration and animal senses?

Nope.

Invisibility? X-ray vision?

Nada.

Well what the fuck?

 

Superpowers For Real Yo

So what kind of superpower am I talking about then? Can it even be a real superpower?

Well, maybe not according to the classic definition of superpower. But we’re talking about the power to change your life, and that seems pretty fuckin’ super to me. Here are just a few abilities this superpower will endow you with . . .

 

  • The power to snap out of that procrastinating mindset every time it rears its ugly little head.

 

  • The conviction to make tough choices and follow through on them, even in the face of uncertainty.

 

 

  •  The power to get up and get shit done, even when you don’t feel like doing jack.

 

Now that doesn’t sound so bad, right? Maybe not as cool as mind control, but I’m sure you’d take it. And the best thing is, the ability already resides within you. All you need to do is find it, set it free, and train it up ‘til it’s something useful. And that’s the real key to this superpower . . . training.

 

Pavlov, Professor X, and the Hounds of Hell

Pavlov

Who’s this Pavlov guy? And why should you care about his demonic dogs?

Well, Ivan Pavlov pioneered the idea of Conditioned Reflex, and was one of the founders of modern Behaviorism. Consider him the “Professor X” of behavioral research, sans wheelchair. Plus more hair (not much though) and a cool-as-shit beard.

Ok, so he’s not really anything like Professor X, but he was still pretty cool. And I guess his hounds weren’t all that demonic, but they were the first to show signs of a hidden superpower, though rudimentary in form.

You see, Pavlov discovered that if he rang a bell whenever he fed his dogs, they would associate the sound of the bell with food . . . even if there was no food.

How’d he know?

Because he measured their rate of saliva production. Ring the bell and production would go up. Every time.

Now think about that for a minute. Just sit there and think.

Can you see the powerful implication here?

What Pavlov showed was that something as simple as the ringing of a bell – a mild external cue – could create actual physical reflexes in a living creature. Conditional reflexes.

Trainable reflexes.

Now, I know a bunch of slobbery dogs doesn’t seem like much to get excited about, but scale it up and things get interesting. Imagine if you could condition yourself to respond to a certain stimulus in a certain way.

For example, let’s say you’re a life long procrastinator. Wouldn’t it be cool to create a conditioned reflex that could instantly snap you out of those procrastinating doldrums?

Or maybe you’re prone to inaction because you’re often overwhelmed with “what if” scenarios. How bitchin’ would it be to condition yourself to just take action, even in spite of those fears?

Sounds pretty good, right? But it is really worthy of being called a superpower? Or am I just blowing smoke up your ass?

 

The Life Changing Effects of Simple Conditioning

On their own, these things seem pretty minor. So what if you can train yourself to get off your ass — on cue — and do some house cleaning? Who cares if you’ve conditioned yourself to speak up even when you’re worried what others might think?

Big fucking deal.

Well, it is a big deal. Though these actions may be small when isolated; in aggregate they amount to huge changes. Just think about the accumulated effects of a lifetime spent gettin’ shit done instead of procrastinating. Think about all the self-confidence you’d build from your proven history of speaking up and acting in the face of fear.

The difference this kind of conditioning can make in your life is nothing short of mammoth. Our lives are not defined by the few big choices we make every once in a while, they’re defined by the sum total of all our choices.

And when you weigh the small every day decisions against the few big ones, you’ll find that it’s those little choices that amount to the greatest influence. The greatest effect.

So if you want to see dramatic and lasting change in your own life, if you want to see real results, then you better start making those little choices today. Over time, they’ll compound.

And therefore, over time, you will become a completely different person.

A better person.

A fucking Superhero.

So let’s get started . . .

 

Gentlemen, We Can Rebuild Him . . . We Have the Technology

Bionic Man

Don’t worry, there’s no need to replace any of your limbs with bionics. And you’re not gonna have to start ringing a bell every time you want to speak up either. That’d just be dumb. You really only need two things to start your behavioral conditioning . . .

A trigger and a reward.

The trigger initiates the desired reflex (i.e. action) and the reward, well, rewards you for it.

You don’t need to over think the reward bit. Doggie treats won’t be necessary. I’ve found that simply completing the desired action is reward enough. Because accomplishment is its own reward.

So that brings us to the trigger. Now we’re gonna have some fun.

In order to develop an effective trigger, you need a powerful cue. Something that can instantly initiate the desired response. A pinch to your ass ain’t gonna cut it. You need something more like a slap in the face. But since you don’t really want to be going around in public smackin’ yourself, you need to figure out something just as powerful, but perhaps a tad more subtle.

Whatever trigger you choose is fine by me . . . so long as it works. But it just so happens that I’ve developed my own trigger, and it’s proven itself effective in my life, and judging from comments, it’s proven useful to others as well. And if you’ve been reading my blog for any length of time, you probably already know what this trigger is.

Yep . . .

Fuck It.

I call ’em the two most powerful words. “Fuck it” is an extremely potent trigger. It’s short, sharp and heavy handed . . . akin to that slap in the face, but not so Stooge-like. When you’ve conditioned yourself to act on it, the effects are . . . dramatic.

I often liken it to flipping a switch. One second you’re sitting there watching cheesy fat-loss infomercials, wondering why you can’t just get your lazy ass off the couch and start that project, then . . . “Fuck it!” . . . next thing you know you’re off and running, tools in hand.

You don’t have to try and convince yourself to get going. You don’t need to weigh the pros and cons. You don’t even think about it . . . you just do it.

Because it’s a reflex.

See how powerful that is?

You’ll often see the power of habit touted as the holy grail of behavioral conditioning, but as powerful as habit is, it doesn’t hold a candle to the power of reflex.

Reflexes are automatic and instantaneous. Practically out of your control. Whereas habits can wear off and be discarded, reflexes are ingrained. Try not being startled when you’re startled. It can’t happen. Because you’re startled!

“Fuck it” triggers the reflex, and that reflex is action:

I don’t really feel like writing today. Maybe I should just . . . “Fuck it!”

Somebody really needs to tell this asshole to shut the hell up, but . . . “Fuck it!”

Do I really have to workout this morning? I’m feelin’ kinda . . . “Fuck it!”

Done, done, and DONE!

 

How to Fuck It Right

Ok, get your head out of the gutter. ‘Cause I’m trying to help you unleash your inner superpower here.

The trick to creating a strong reflex with the “fuck it” trigger is to start small and build it up. If you try to use it for something too big too soon it’s gonna fail. Conditioned reflex works both ways . . . the more you fail when using the trigger, the less effective it becomes. You’re actually training it to not work.

So don’t. Ruin. The trigger.

Start small. And stay small for a long time – let it build gradually. Organically. Let me show you . . .

I first developed this technique to help me out with the last few reps when lifting weights. It wasn’t really planned, it just sorta happened. Anyone who’s spent much time under the iron knows how painful those last reps can be . . . if you’re really pushing yourself.

Sometimes you just want to give in.

But when the pain was at its strongest, when I was about to give up, I’d just holler a mighty “FUCK IT!” and I could always squeeze out a few more reps.

Over time I found myself saying “fuck it” more and more often. And it spread beyond just the weight room. I discovered I could use it to break procrastination – as a life-long procrastinator, that was a huge revelation for me. Life changing, actually. Then I discovered that “fuck it” could snap me out of that “stuck” feeling when I was frozen with doubt and fear.

Oh hell yeah!

Now I was actually getting somewhere! Now I was seeing results! The more I used it, the more effective it became.

Until one day it was just reflex.

That’s why you need to build it up slow. It takes time and effort to create the reflex. To get it ingrained. It took me years. But when done right, you’ll be damn near unstoppable.

Just like a fucking Superhero.

Better . . . Stronger . . . Faster

Superman vs. Thor

So the secret’s out. It is possible to become a Superhero. To transform yourself. From Clark Kent to fucking Superman with just a simple two-word trigger. But it’ll take training. Conditioning.

Effort.

Because real superpowers don’t come from simply donning some alien ring. No magic hammer’s gonna appear out of the blue and grant you mythical strength.

Superpowers are earned.

You gotta pay with training and dedication. With brutal persistence.

And most important of all . . .

You simply have to learn to say “Fuck it.”

Cheers!

(Super Lego Man by Julian Fong @ flickr, photo of Ivan Pavlov from the National History of Medicine, Six Million Dollar Man by Mike Mozart @ flickr, Superman vs. Thor by JD Hancock @ flickr.)

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Comments

  1. I think you’ve hit the nail on the head when you say that it is the small choices in our life that compound over time that really matter. The state of the nation (and the people within it) clearly shows that people don’t understand this basic fact at a fundamental level.

    p.s. love the pics in this post…

    • I hear you Scott. Everyone is looking for the next big thing to take their life to that next level, but they completely ignore the little things which are actually the ones that will make the most difference. We’ve got things ass backwards in a lot of ways.

      Glad you liked the pics! I spent hours trying to find just the right ones. I wanted them to really “pop” in a nostalgic sorta way.

      Cheers!

  2. It sounds like your “fuck it” works like Nike’s “just do it.” Rewards are powerful. I’ve learned to keep writing, keep exercising, keep reading, etc, because I can see and feel rewards, slow as they may be at times. But if I just stick with it, the rewards will grow.

    • “Fuck it” and “Just do it” are basically the same thing. As is Vincent’s “5 Second” rule. “Fuck it” just happens to be a bit more “me.” And like I said, it evolved gradually and unintentionally. But when you see the rewards, and feel them, like you say, it makes the effort so worthwhile.

      Cheers!

  3. Brilliant Trevor, to relate Fuck It (with a cap F) to Pavlov’s dogs! Did not see that coming. That empty eye socket on the 6-Mil man is going to cost me a few hours of sleep though, cripes!

    Believe it or not, I have used a slap in my own face to get me going, but always in an empty bathroom or the like. I suppose I could imagine slapping myself in the face to get things rolling, but I think I need the sound and the shock and the sick satisfaction of just having slapped my self in the face.

    Sometimes, I tell myself “Come on Fucker!”, and that too is very useful. As Dan suggests, I want those rewards, but the freakin’ effort or whatever stands in my way. But that trigger/reflex/reward system is powerful indeed, and we have to develop and implement them if we want results – even if they are a bit quirky or even downright sick;)

    • Slappin’ yourself in the bathroom and yellin’ “Come on Fucker!” IS downright sick CJ!

      As sick as it gets.

      But yeah, I can see what you’re saying about the “shock” factor to really snap you into action. It truly does make a difference. Something about that jolt to the system gets you moving and keeps you going. Whatever it is, I’m just glad it works. Otherwise I’d still be that same ‘ol miserable procrastinating bastard I used to be. I wasn’t kidding when I said “fuck it” can change your life . . . it certainly changed mine.

      Cheers!
      p.s. That empty eye socket was just Steve Austin’s bionic zoom eye. Nothing creepy about a dude with a bionic zoom eye, right?

      • I save that tactic for really serious situations, but I do use the “Come on Fucker!” all the time.

        No offense to you or Steve Austin or his bionic zoom eye. I think I meant to say cool and somehow I typed creepy. That was plain asinine.

        • Actually, I use those exact words during my farmer’s walks all the time. When I just need to get up that last little hill before I can finally drop the weights. When my forearms are burning and my shoulders feel ready to pop out of their sockets, I turn into the Little Train that Could. But instead of “I think I can, I think I can,” it’s “Come on fucker, come on fucker!” It works.

  4. Hi Trevor,

    This was brilliant post with great advice, pictures and humour, too!

    I loved what you wrote about training our reflexes to go other more resourceful places, rather than going to fear and any other state, which might hold us back. Indeed, all those behaviours (such as lack of action, becoming scared etc.) are habits. Our minds have been trained to go those places. We can reverse this and use the same situations that would normally make us freeze, to actually send our brains to states of confidence and assertiveness.

    Thank you.

    • Thanks Hiten! I’m glad you liked the post and the pictures. As I mentioned to Scott, I spent a ton of time trying to find just the right pictures to make this post stand out.

      You make a great distinction about training our reflexes for purposeful action instead of reactive fear. Such a huge thing, but ignored for the most part. But when you think about it, it can be such a powerful tool. Reflexes are neutral, they can be used to run or they can be used to fight.

      I prefer to fight.

      Cheers!

  5. Good connection Trevor! The only implication I thought of was wondering what Pavlov did with all those little jars of dog saliva. Do you suppose he just threw them out? or…

    I especially like the idea of an organic trigger. The story of your weight lifting makes perfect sense. You naturally needed a little extra boost to push through, and now it works to give you that all the time. Don’t know that I have one besides breathing slow, although I have tried slapping myself in the face before. It’s a good idea though – pick a specific thing you need to get yourself to do, pick some random thing you tend to do when you do that, and combine them into a repeatable system.

    • Dammit Morgan! You just summed up my entire 1800 word post in one little sentence . . .

      “pick a specific thing you need to get yourself to do, pick some random thing you tend to do when you do that, and combine them into a repeatable system.”

      Yep, that was it in a nutshell.

      And frankly, I really don’t want to know what Pavlov did with all that dog drool. I can think of some pretty messed up things. Maybe we ought to see what sort of sick shit CJ could come up with.

      On second thought, that’s probably not such a good idea. That guy scares me . . .

      Cheers!

      • Trevor, you know this is like hanging frog testicles over a pond full of gators, right? Alright, after a night of tossing and turning and horrible night terrors with occasional bouts of nausea, this is what I’ve concocted (not like a perv though):

        We have all savored the dog drool at one time or another. Pavlov was incidentally the founder of Tootsie Pops. That’s what you get after 337 licks.

  6. Note to self for 56th time: Do not read Trevor before heading off to bed!

    I think this is brilliant, and I realize I’ve been doing some version of this for the past couple of years. Now I have the two words to go with it! I can see where it would be great for weight lifting, and – though I’m no pro – I am able to do those last few reps by gritting my teeth and sucking it up. Now I’m going to yell, but I will not slap myself in the face. What kind of sicko does that? 😉

    Great advice always, Trevor. Now I’m off to don my Super Woman cape!

    • Ha! I’d have thought you’d learned that by now Tammy!

      It definitely helps with the weightlifting, though CJ’s “Come on Fucker!” works just as well (and has also been a favorite of mine, depending on the exercise).

      Have fun in your Superwoman cape! Shit, that just sounded bad. Or good.

      Cheers!

  7. Fuck that was long Trevor but a great point/s made. Good on You!

    Be good to yourself
    David

  8. Trevor! Hilarious! I’m reading this post first thing in the morning and it’s just what I needed!

    Triggers – totally overlooked. An alarm is a trigger to get out of bed. Getting out of bed is the trigger to brush our teeth – we already KNOW we can build respond to triggers and build habits, but get so damn comfortable in the procrastination zone.

    One thing that’s worked for me is if I want to do something daily – move it to either the first thing I do in the morning or the last thing before I sleep. And I make it as painless as possible.

    For example, I work out first thing in the morning. My workout gear and weights are all near my bed – no excuses !

    Superpowers are earned. I dig.

    – Razwana

    • Thanks Razwana!

      It’s so true about triggers, we use them on a daily basis, but never even think about it. They’re just part of our routine. So why not use them to fight the powers of evil (Procrastination Man)?

      I can definitely get down with the first thing in the morning bit. Morning is when I’m at my most productive. And keeping your weights by your bedside is just plain hardcore Razwana! Awesome!

      Cheers!

  9. “Fuck it!” is an epic motto to live by.

    Ultimately our time here is limited and we’re not going to be remembered for the shit we bitched out on – whether that be skipping out on a workout, not sitting down to write or not walking over and talking to the girl who was eyeing you up. Saying “Fuck it” acts as a way to cut through our own internal bullshit in a hurry.

    Pavlov’s theory is absolute money. It’s been about two years since I took psychology but just about everything in that class blew my mind. When people think about dieting, exercise, starting a business or whatever they think it’s going to be this insurmountable goal. But little do they know you can utilize the ideas of Pavlov’s theories to slowly break through and condition themselves to be cool in discomfort.

    Solid shit man.

    • Thanks Kevin! And thanks for such an inspiring comment!

      “Ultimately our time here is limited and we’re not going to be remembered for the shit we bitched out on . . .”

      This is gold my friend. Pure fucking gold.

      And though we’ll never be remembered for the shit we bitched out on, we ourselves will remember it for a lifetime.

      It’s called regret.

      And it’s the last fucking thing any of us will ever want when we’re laying there on our death bed.

      Cheers!

      • “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat. ”

        Great Reminder — reminds me of my thoughts right before I bungee jumped, decided to train for that marathon, took off to another country, reached out to be in a motion film, jumped out of a perfectly good airplane.

        • Awesome fucking quote dude! Teddy always tells it true. I can see why it’s such a great reminder for you. It speaks so much truth . . . truth that many would rather not hear.

          But truth is truth, whether one chooses to listen or not.

          And it sounds like you’ve incorporated that mindset perfectly. I’m envious. I’ve always wanted to try sky diving and bungee jumping. Gotta quit making excuses and just get to it.

          Cheers!

  10. I have never been a big fan of super heroes. I think we just need to be better humans in order to succeed: nicer, kinder, more open, organized and loving and stop using our cell phones for God’s sake and start looking at each other at least once in a while. Or we will turn into cyborgs.

    • I can get behind that message Elena. Especially the cell phone bit. I’m pretty sure that one day we’ll all be cyborgs anyway.

      But “nicer, kinder, more open, organized and loving” is pretty good too. Certainly something worth striving for.

      Cheers!

  11. Yep, Teddy is the man.
    Bungee Jumping is pretty terrifying.
    But it’s all perception, as it’s definitely safer than driving a car.
    But that’s a whole different topic…

    • I always figured that sky diving would be scarier than bungee jumping. Although that kind of bungee jumping where your head dips into the water is pretty damn crazy. That’s pushing it close.

      • In my opinion bungee jumping sooo much scarier — and I’ll tell you why.
        YOU have to jump.
        Plus, the ground is so much closer — out of an airplane you’re so high up that it’s almost not even real. Plus, you’re jumping tandem, so even if you didn’t want to jump, you’ve got plenty of help 😉

        The water dip is exactly what I did (will re-cap in a blog post soon).
        It’s wild.
        I was scared at first, but I saw them crank out 20 folks before me I realized how scientific it really is.
        I mean, you could tell them to just make your head wet, go down to your waist, or dunk your whole body in the water.
        That’s how precise these guys were.

        • That’s freakin’ amazing! I’m sold! I need to get my ass out there and just do it. I can see what you’re saying . . . when you put it that way, bungee jumping does actually seem much scarier. But the most important question . . . which is more fun/thrilling/exhilarating? I always figured sky diving to be the ultimate experience because of the long free fall.

          • In my honest opinion, they are probably equal. Bungee, you take control yourself. In skydiving, it lasts much longer. But in skydiving, it took me 20 seconds to get my bearings and get used to what moving at terminal velocity feels like to your face. By that time the parachute was opening. But after that the ride is quite enjoyable…

          • “Terminal velocity”

            Dude, that just sounds wild. Crazy wild. I seriously need to sign me up for some of that.

  12. Andy Warhol had a similar trick, but he said “so what”…

    “Sometimes people let the same problem make them miserable for years when they could just say, “So what.” That’s one of my favorite things to say. “So what.” “My mother didn’t love me.” So what. “My husband won’t ball me.” So what. “I’m a success but I’m still alone.” So what. I don’t know how I made it through all the years before I learned how to do that trick. It took a long time for me to learn it, but once you do, you never forget.”

    That’s from the Philosophy of Andy Warhol. I love that book.

    I think your way is more effective because it’s a stronger word + I’ve tried your way 🙂 But, the idea that we make a bigger deal out of things than we have to is the same.

    • That’s interesting Denise. I didn’t know that. Or much about Andy Warhol, for that matter. It does sound pretty damn similar. Except it sounds like his was more geared towards accepting a situation, kind of like a coping mechanism. Whereas “Fuck it” is geared towards creating an action.

      That could be a powerful combination. A “Dynamic Duo,” so to speak. “So what” to accept the situation, and “Fuck it” to change it. I like it!

      Thanks for that cool bit of info Denise. I’m definitely gonna test it out.

      Cheers!

      • I like them both, actually.

        I could see the “So what?” approach as more of a way to say “Fuck it” to victimization – like when you find yourself (or say, an offspring) complaining or whining about something.

        I’ve used what I call “The Power of Fuck That” – I think there may be some subtle differences, but the common denominator may be a rejection of self-imposed limitations.

        Great post and follow up conversation – enjoying it a ton.

        • “The Power of Fuck That”

          I like it!

          To me, “fuck that” is a refusal to accept anything short of the ideal. Anything less. Whatever that may be to you. Whether from yourself, or the world at large. And it needs to be said with a heavy exclamation. I think we’ve got a full-on Superhero team abrewin’ here. Between “Fuck It,” “So What,” and “Fuck That,” we should be able to take on any challenge imaginable. Awesome!

  13. “Kill it with fire!” OR lately it’s been, “Shut your trap and just start”

    Great post Trevor. I love the idea of creating a super power within me. Whenever I hear crazy success stories, I notice this common theme : they didn’t give up in the face of resistance, they killed it fire.

    • “Kill it with fire.”

      I like it Alex!

      It sums things up nicely. And it seems like a great way to stay focused and determined. Take massive action and get massive results. Yep, sounds to me like it would lead to success.

      Thanks for chiming in Alex.

      Cheers!

  14. There’s a really awesome quote encapsulates everything you wrote 🙂

    “Ordinary things done consistently produce extraordinary results” 😉

    By the way Trev, I’ve never read an article with that many ‘fucks’ in it…lol

    Awesome..lol

    • Ha! I guess I outdid myself there. I figure if I say it enough times people will just become numb to it. Then it won’t be such a big deal anymore 😉

      Who’s the quote from, by the way?

  15. Now I can’t help but wonder whether Thor or Superman would win.

    For some reason, when I hear Pavlov, it’s a trigger to remember Skinner, and I’m a fan of Skinner’s quote:

    “Thoughts are behaviors we haven’t learned to observe yet.”

    • It’s gotta be Thor. He’s a freakin’ god! Superman’s just some alien in blue spandex. He doesn’t stand a chance.

      And I have to say . . . I like that quote by Skinner. I don’t know much about him or his work, but I like the idea that our thoughts might someday become our behaviors. It’s a great incentive to keep the right thoughts for the kind of life you want to someday live. And the kind of person you someday hope to be.

      Thanks for stopping by and sharing the cool quote J.D.

      Cheers!

  16. You simply have to learn to say “Fuck it.”

    You could not be more right, my friend. Try to live my life by this every day!

  17. Yeah, I love the idea of making things automatic. Just do them because you’ve conditioned yourself to do them. It reminds me of a few years ago when I was working out. When I’d get home after a long day, I’d do a few things until it was six o’clock. Then I’d just tell myself, “oh, time to workout.” My trigger was seeing the clock at that time and I’d just go without thinking about it. When it’s automatic, it’s great because you just get up and do it.

    I love how you incorporated Pavlov into your ideas here. I’ve been long fascinated with what he did with his dogs. Although some of the things he did were unethical. In order to measure the saliva, he surgically implanted a collection device to the sides of their face. What’s worse is when he did the same thing on people. But his ideas worked. And if you can harness them like you said, it truly is a superpower.

    • Yeah, I’ve heard some of that crazy shit he did with people. Pretty messed up. A different time, I guess. But his work was still groundbreaking nonetheless.

      I love your story about the six o’clock workouts! That’s a perfect example of a trigger. And a trigger for great action at that. It really is possible to create these triggers that get us to act in positive fashion without pause. It may be hard to believe if you’ve never experienced it for yourself, but it’s true.

      And it’s powerful.

      It can truly change your life. If you give it the chance.

      Cheers!

    • LOL – I’ve never understood Pavlov and the saliva. If a dog thinks food or treats are coming, their tongues come out anyway.

      Maybe it needed to be measured to be published.

  18. You created a great blog!

    All the best to the future!

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